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Texas Buckeye, White Buckeye
Aesculus glabra var. arguta


Texas buckeye has palmately compound leaves with seven to nine (sometimes eleven) leaflets, vs. the five leaflets of red buckeye. The flowers are creamy white to light yellow, appearing in terminal clusters after the leaves appear. The fruit, a leathery capsule with blunt spines, has one to three large shiny seeds. The seeds are known to be poisonous, and it is possible that all parts of the plant are as well. It tends to prematurely drop leaves in hot, droughty situations, due to leaf scorch and fungal diseases. Usually a small shrub or small tree, Texas buckeye reaches its largest size (more than 40 feet) in the hard limestone of the central Edwards Plateau, although it also occurs in the northern Blacklands, Cross Timbers and Prairies, Pineywoods, and Post Oak Savannah.

Plant Habit or Use: large shrub small tree

Exposure: sun partial sun

Flower Color: creamy white to light yellow

Blooming Period: spring

Fruit Characteristics: spiny capsules containing black seeds

Height: to 40 ft.

Width: to 35 ft.

Plant Character: deciduous

Heat Tolerance: medium

Water Requirements: medium

Soil Requirements: adaptable

USDA Hardiness Zone: 5

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