TAMU Floriculture Program Home Page Container Gardens Home Page
Why Make Container Gardens
Getting Started with Container Gardens
Design Principles Used in Container
Color Theory in Container Gardens
Color Wheel
Definition of Commonly Used Terms
Tips for Container Gardens
Image Gallery of Sample Containers

Link to Aggie Horticulture

Getting Started

Two Types of Container Gardens
Grow Together
Put Together
Advantages
Disadvantages
Advantages
Disadvantages

Doubt in final product Confidence in final product

Possible plug death Better plant survival
Natural gathered look
Neat, methodical look
Plants intertwine together
Plants retain individuality
Ease of planting

Labor of transplanting
Good for large scale growers
Good for grower/retailer



How to get started with grow-together container gardens
1st Year
Do some experimenting with combinations of colors, species, and new introductions for the season.

2nd Year
Eliminate any combinations that didn't work so well and try some new combinations.

Develope a "Basic" group of combination containers and grow those in large quantity.

Each Year
Keep records so that adjustments as to number of plugs per pot for different species, total number of plugs per pot, etc. can be made.

Add some new crops in with combinations that worked.

Make a few adjustments to your basic line.

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TAMU Floriculture Program | Container Gardens

Why Make Container Gardens | Getting Started | Design Principles
Color Theory | ColorWheel | Definition of Terms | Tips

Photo Gallery of Container Gardens | Links | Aggie Horticulture