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Bluebonnet Seed Production

Transcript

The bluebonnets are beautiful at this time of the year because we've had plenty of rain this spring and they are really looking nice. What's so hard to find though are the few whites out there. Wouldn't it be nice if we could have some whites to plant with the blues? You people have made it possible.

About five or six years ago a lot of you sent in some white seeds. These were planted out and the blues that came up from the white seeds were segregated out. Now look what we have, eleven acres of white seeds which we will be able to sell and distribute next year so that you can plant some whites with your blues and really have a beautiful bed of the Texas state flower.

Not only have the whites been found but, we also we also have some different color variance, such as this Worthington Blue that you see, such as the pinks. And not only that, but they are being grown commercially in rows just like a crop in the field, which means that we will never be without bluebonnet seeds again, regardless of the weather.

Yea, we've come a long way with this weed that Texas made the state flower, called the bluebonnet, and we have a long way to go. Who knows one of these days these pinks that you see in front of me will be available in the local nursery for you to plant in your own yard. We may even find an Aggie Maroon you never can tell, but we'll keep looking. (Seed available from www.wildseedfarms.com)

This has been Jerry Parsons Vegetable Specialist and Semi-Bluebonnet Specialist Texas Agricultural Extension Service the Weekend Gardener.

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